Welcome to Regina 2017

Countdown to CWSF

May 15 to May 20

Welcome to Regina 2017

Finalists, delegates and judges: Register here

ImportantInformation

Click above to select your role

The purpose of the CWSF Awards is to reward outstanding scientific and technological achievement and excellence by Canada’s young scientists at the national level and to recognize those national finalists at the Canada-Wide Science Fair whose achievement places them above the rest.

Rigorous judging standards ensure all projects are assessed critically and fairly. All are judged on the following criteria (Judge's Marking Form):

  • Scientific Thought
  • Originality and Creativity
  • Communication

About 325 judges from University, the public and private sectors, sponsors and regional science fair partners across Ontario volunteer their time to judge the science on display at the CWSF.

Awards include the Special, Challenge, Excellence (medals), and Grand Awards, with nearly $1 million presented as cash, scholarships, travel and other prizes!

Judging Policy

Youth Science Canada, with its National Judging Committee (NJC), establishes the criteria for awards, sets the judging standards, oversees selection of the CWSF Chief Judge, recruits award sponsors and organizes the presentation of the awards.

The CWSF Chief Judge recruits and trains judges, coordinates the judging process and selects the Special, Challenge, and Excellence Award recipients. A special Youth Science Canada panel selects the Grand Award recipients from the gold medal winners.

Awards are assigned to the best eligible project on the basis of ranking projects relative to others at the current CWSF.

Award recipients are selected based on the quality of their projects and presentations. Neither formal nor informal selection criteria based on gender or ethnocultural heritage are permitted in the National Awards Program or at the Canada-Wide Science Fair.

Judging Process

Special Awards

These awards are for outstanding projects that meet specific criteria within a particular aspect of science and often reflect the special interests of the sponsoring foundations, companies and professional associations. All Special Awards include cash awards, trips, summer internships and other prizes for outstanding projects that meet specific criteria established by the sponsor(s).

Self-nomination is required; judges will only consider projects that the finalists have nominated for these awards in the online registration system. The list includes all available Special Awards. A project may be nominated for up to three Special Awards. Only those awards for which a project is eligible will appear in the Special Awards area of the CWSF online registration system.

Special Awards judges spend approximately 10 minutes with each project. Judges expect to hear a brief (5 minute) summary of the project and why it deserves the award, followed by time for questions.

Self-nomination is a commitment to accept the award as offered. If you plan to nominate your project for a travel or summer experience award, be sure you do so only after careful consideration and with parent/guardian approval.

Please note: Certain Special Awards involve travel and a commitment to be away from home for an extended period of time, to travel to another country and/or to live in unfamiliar surroundings. All travel involves an element of risk. Foreign Affairs Canada provides advice to international travellers through their website.

View Special Awards

Challenge Awards

Challenge Awards recognize the top project in each of the 7 Canada-Wide Youth Science Challenges in each grade category. The seven Canada-Wide Youth Science Challenges – Discovery, Energy, Environment, Health, Information, Innovation and Resources – focus on issues that are important to Canadian youth, the future of their country and their world. They are meant to inspire students to exercise their curiosity and creativity by answering a question or solving a problem by doing a science project.

At the CWSF, 3 awards are presented - junior, intermediate and senior - for the best project that addresses each challenge.

During registration, finalists identify the challenge best addressed by their project. Interviews for these awards are unscheduled, and students may or may not see a judge for one of these awards.

View Challenge Awards.

Excellence Awards

Excellence Awards (CWSF medals) recognize science and technology excellence. The judging is a relative process, with medals awarded based on the ranking of consensus scores for each project within a grade category. A total of 70 medals is available in each grade category - junior, intermediate, and senior:

  • 10 Gold Medals (including $250 cash)
  • 20 Silver Medals 
  • 40 Bronze Medals

All medals are normally awarded as judged; however, the awarding of a gold medal requires that the following minimum standard be attained:

  • The project demonstrates Level 3 or 4 of Scientific Thought (see Judge’s Marking Sheet).
  • Analysis and conclusions are appropriate and based on the data;
  • The project demonstrates some knowledge of the relevant background and theory; and
  • The project contains no glaring or significant errors.

Each judging team is assigned a specific group of projects in the same grade category. Normally, four different judges evaluate each project. Judging is a three-step process:

First, judges read the Project Reports in advance and, on the evening before judging, view the projects without the finalists being present.

On judging day, each of the four judges meets with the finalist(s) for about 20-minutes. Judges expect to spend approximately 10 minutes hearing a presentation about the project, followed by 10 minutes for questions.

After the finalists have left the exhibit area for the day, each judging team meets to discuss each project and assign a consensus score based on the project level and relative merit of each project. After these scores are compiled, representatives of each judging team within a grade category meet to review the ranked scores and determine the Excellence (medal) and Challenge Award recipients. This step involves considerable discussion among the judges and may require additional viewing of projects without the finalists present. Sponsor representatives may work with the category teams at this time to select the recipients of Special Awards.

Scholarships

Several universities provide scholarships to medal winners at the Canada-Wide Science Fair.

View scholarships.

Grand Awards

The Grand Awards include two Platinum Awards and the Best Project Award, which are presented to the top three projects at the CWSF - best junior, intermediate, and senior. All gold medalists are automatically considered for the Grand Awards.

Each of the two Platinum Awards includes $1,000 cash and a crystal presentation award.

The Best Project Award includes $2,500 cash and a crystal presentation award, making it one of the most valuable and prestigious awards for youth in Canada.

A special panel of Youth Science Canada appointed judges selects the Grand Award recipients.

Every project at the CWSF uses the same display unit - an aluminum frame with two white vertical panels, a triangular table, and a header sign pre-printed with the project title and finalist name(s). Use of the CWSF display unit is mandatory - do not bring a backboard of any kind.

The dimensions of the CWSF display unit (accurate to 1cm) are shown on the left below. The diagram on the right illustrates how standard paper pages fit on a display panel when arranged in a grid. Click each image to download a PDF file suitable for printing.

Display Requirements

The following information provides a summary of the display requirements. Finalists, delegates, parents, and Regional Coordinators are urged to review the CWSF Project Displays policy in detail when preparing CWSF display materials and before signing the CWSF Permission and Release Form. Some items accepted for display at a Regional Science Fair may not be permitted at the CWSF.

Before being approved for competition at the CWSF, each project must pass an inspection to ensure that the material on display complies with the CWSF Project Displays policy.

Once the project has been approved, no display materials may be added.

Presentation Materials

Presentation materials must be attached to the white display panels above the table, and may overlap from one panel to the other. Materials may not be attached to the display unit frame, including the header sign.

Adhesives for affixing presentation materials to the display panels will be supplied; no other adhesives may be used. At the end of the CWSF, display panels must be returned to their original condition, with all project materials and adhesives removed.

Although we will have sufficient tape for all participants, you may wish to bring your own supply of 3M Scotch 110 Heavy Duty Mounting Tape, as pictured, which is available in 1.9m rolls at Staples and Home Depot.

Presentation information including text, graphics, photographs and other data on the display panels must be printed on bond paper (laser, inkjet, or standard copier), or photographic paper. Laminated paper is permissible, but discouraged due to the environmental impact.

Construction paper, Bristol board and papers listed above may be used to outline or border presentation information or to add small decorative elements to the display panels.

If you are preparing a large-format poster, Staples will print a 24 x 36 inch page for about $30. A local municipal office, engineering or architecture firm, land surveyor, or university might be able to print a large poster at lower cost.

Finalists are encouraged to bring a USB drive with the files for their presentation materials saved as PDF files.

Display Materials

Papers presented on the table must be secured in a binder, Duo-tang, presentation folder, plastic sleeve or other appropriate enclosure.

Other display materials must comply with the CWSF Project Displays policy, which includes detailed rules for: fire safety; electrical safety; structural and mechanical safety; chemical safety; biohazards; human subjects; animals & animal parts; firearms; and hazardous materials and equipment.

Computers, tablets, and other electronic devices that comply with electrical safety requirements may be used as display materials. Finalists should remove all valuables from their display when the exhibit hall is closed.

A project may be granted additional space to display an innovation that exceeds the capacity of the display unit table. This request must be made by the Regional Coordinator to the Youth Science Canada Zone Representative. The final authority for approval rests with the National Science Fair Committee Chair.

Display Equipment and Damage

Although every effort will be made to prevent damage to exhibits, Youth Science Canada, the Host Committee or other sponsoring organizations or cooperating groups accepts no responsibility for loss or damage to any exhibit or part thereof.

The Principles of Mentoring

When participating in a mentoring relationship, Youth Science Canada asks that all mentors and mentees review these guidelines, in order to develop a rewarding, beneficial relationship for all who are involved.

Youth Science Canada is dedicated to nurturing the scientific impulse, creativity, and dedication amongst Canadian youth - encouraging them to develop scientific and technical knowledge and skills through project-based science. We are inspired by the potential of Canada’s youth to improve the world through science and we make programs and resources to help realize that potential. We recognize that mentorship from those established in the Canadian scientific community can provide an enriching relationship for youth engaged in project-based science, adding to knowledge and experience.

A mentor is a teacher, guide, or advisor who works with an individual who is developing their scientific knowledge and expertise, providing support, insight, and resources from their own scientific background and experience. Mentors encourage and empower youth involved in project-based science to help them succeed and discover their own abilities and passions in a supportive, non-judgemental manner. Mentors provide an environment in which youth may learn and grow, whether that be in a laboratory setting, or virtual communication.

Mentors benefit from their participation by raising their academic and community profile and developing a relationship with a member of Canada’s youth.

It is the student’s role, and not the mentor’s, to conceive the project’s specific topic. All data taking must be the student’s own, unless the student does not represent it as his or her own and credits the actual data taker properly. Similarly, analysis of the data, the write-up of the project, and any public presentation of thereof are also exclusively the student’s responsibility. A student undertaking a mentored project has the responsibility to disclose that her/his project was mentored and by whom.

Responsibilities of Mentors and Mentees:

  • Treat your mentor or mentee with respect at all times;
  • Commit sufficient time and effort towards your mentorship. Set clear expectations for each other;
  • Always communicate in a truthful manner;
  • Do not accept/offer any kind of payment for your mentoring relationship
  • Maintain the confidentiality of the mentoring relationship
  • Read and respect Youth Science Canada's Academic Integrity Policy.

Responsibility of Mentors:

  • Support and encourage the goals of your mentee - be enthusiastic and share your love of science;
  • Encourage your mentee to maintain high scientific and ethical standards;
  • Provide advice, guidance, and access to facilities or equipment not otherwise available to your mentee where possible;
  • Ensure that your mentee is an active participant;
  • Avoid the intent or appearance of unethical or compromising practice in communications, actions, and relationships;
  • Maintain the confidentiality of all ideas, products, and materials that a mentee has, or may develop. Do not use any ideas, products, or materials from your mentee in order to further your academic, business, or financial career;
  • Acknowledge any conflicts of interest relative to competitions involving the project to your mentee;
  • Do not make inquiries regarding the decisions made by judges in competitions in which the project is entered;
  • Refer your mentee to Youth Science Canada for issues or questions that you feel unqualified to answer;
  • Always maintain a professional relationship with your mentee.
  • For the protection of the mentor and the student, all meetings should be held in the presence of others during business hours, at the student’s school in the presence of a teacher or staff member, or at another location with a parent or guardian present.

Responsibility of Mentees:

  • Clearly communicate your goals and needs for your project to your mentor;
  • Maintain the confidentiality of the mentoring relationship;
  • Communicate regularly and openly with your mentor;
  • Complete any tasks you have agreed to do with your mentor in a timely manner; Maintain the confidentiality of all ideas, products, and materials that your mentor has, or may develop.
  • Hold all sensitive scientific information provided through the relationship with your mentor in strict confidence.
  • Always maintain a professional relationship with your mentor.

Levels of Mentorship

Youth Science Canada defines the following levels of mentorship:

  1. Student does not receive any mentoring.
  2. Student exchanges a few emails or phone calls, and/or meets with the mentor once or twice to discuss the student’s ideas.
  3. Student occasionally contacts the mentor by email or phone, and/or meets occasionally with the mentor who provided some advice or materials.
  4. Student has regular contact with the mentor by email or phone, and/or meets regularly with the mentor who provides advice, materials, assistance with design/testing, or data analysis.
  5. Student has regular face-to-face contact with the mentor and regular access to advice, materials, space, equipment, design/testing, or other personnel in a specialized facility.
  6. Student works closely with the mentor over an extended period of time to develop the project idea, plan and conduct the research/development, and analyze the results or test the innovation.

Finalists will be asked to enter the level of mentorship received when they register for the Canada-Wide Science Fair.

Youth Science Canada has identified seven challenges, known as the Canada-Wide Youth Science Challenges, which focus on issues that are important to Canada’s youth, the future of our country and our world. They reflect the growing trend in current Canadian science, technology and innovation to focus on specific multi- and interdisciplinary global, national and provincial issues.

Youth Science Canada’s Challenges are meant to inspire youth to exercise their curiosity and creativity by doing a project that addresses one of these Challenges:

Discovery
Sponsor: Youth Science Canada
Create new fundamental knowledge based on your curiosity by asking a question and using the techniques of scientific inquiry to develop an answer.

Energy
Sponsor: Youth Science Canada
Improve our use of current energy sources, enable the transition to alternative energy sources, or reduce our energy footprint.

Environment
Sponsor: Youth Science Canada
Reduce our impact on, improve our understanding of, and ensure the quality of water, air, soil, and the diversity of living things.

Health
Sponsor: AstraZeneca
Increase our understanding of the human body, or apply science and technology to improve health, control disease, or support an aging population.

Information
Sponsor: Youth Science Canada
Enhance communication and our use of information using digital and networking technologies, or applications of new media.

Innovation
Sponsor: Youth Science Canada
Combine scientific principles with your creativity to develop a new material, structure, device, or system to solve a problem or improve an existing solution.

Resources
Sponsor: Youth Science Canada
Develop better ways to use our natural resources that provide sustainable sources of food, products, or prosperity.

At the CWSF, 3 awards are presented - junior, intermediate and senior - for the best project that addresses each challenge.

The choice of Challenge is determined by the Finalist in consultation with the Delegate.  The choice of Challenge has relatively minor consequences, because the only award based on the Challenge selected is a single award.  Medals are not awarded based on the Challenge, and neither are Special Awards.

We are excited to be hosting the 56th annual Canada-Wide Science in Regina, the Queen City and the capital of Saskatchewan.  Representing a land of vast expanses, small communities, and friendly people, the Regina 2017 Host Committee is ready to welcome visitors from all over Canada for this wonderful event!

As parents, we thought you might be interested in reading about some of the goals we have as a host team:
  • To provide a safe and secure environment for all participants:
    • All Finalists, Delegates, Staff and Volunteers are required to wear a name badge with their photo on it throughout the Festival. The back of the name badge includes emergency contact information as well as any relevant medical information (eg., allergies).
    • The host site for the Fair is the University of Regina campus. Students will spend most of their time in the Wakpá and Paskwāw residences, The Centre for Kinesiology, Health, and Sport, and the Riddell Centre, containing their rooms, the exhibit hall, and the cafeteria.  These buildings are adjacent to each other, and it takes only a couple of minutes to travel from one building to the next, using either the Academic Green outside or the hallways inside.  As one would expect from the prairies, there are no hills to climb!
    • In addition to the host team, there will also be campus security personnel available to help ensure a safe environment. All finalists and delegates will be staying in residence accommodations.  Our residences are controlled access, meaning that exterior doors are kept locked after 11:00 pm.  We have live-in staff in each building and work closely with our campus security to ensure the safety of all of our guests.  Meals will be served in the Riddell Centre where participants are free to choose items that are safe for them.  Please be sure to tell us about special dietary needs on the registration form and encourage your student to identify these needs to their delegate(s) as well as food service staff in our dining room and at events if they have any questions.
    • Please ensure that your child understands that the adults appointed by his/her regional science fair (known as the delegates) are acting on your behalf, and that your child must have any activity approved by that adult before proceeding. It is vital to your child’s safety and well being that we have delegates fulfill this parental role at CWSF 2017. It is equally important that your child recognize the delegates’ authority as well as that of any authorized CWSF officials or appointed delegates, who are ensuring a safe environment for everyone’s sake.
    • As part of the registration process, everyone (student finalists and delegates alike) should view the CWSF Orientation Video (add link) to learn about emergency procedures, safety, and expectations for behavior. An emergency contact list will also be provided to all participants.
  • To provide the finalists with exciting new experiences and opportunities to create memories and friendships to last a lifetime:
    • From our opening event to evening activities, tours of our province, STEAM, a Festival of Learning, the awards ceremony and closing event, we have planned lots of incredible experiences for your student.  Please encourage them to be open to these experiences and make the most of this week!
  • As part of the registration process, everyone (Finalists and Delegates alike) should view the CWSF Orientation Video to learn about emergency procedures, safety, and expectations for behaviour. 
  • We wish to provide the Finalists with exciting new experiences and opportunities to create memories and friendships to last a lifetime. From our Opening Event to the Closing Ceremonies, we have planned many incredible experiences for your child. Please encourage them to be open to these experiences and make the most of this week!
 
Further CWSF 2017 details will be posted on this website in the months ahead, so simply review the content as May 2017 approaches. If you have any questions or require more information between now and then, please refer to the contact details. During the week of the fair, there will be a CWSF App featuring daily information to help you keep up with the activities. We will be sending a link out to all selected participants in early May.  
 
If you plan to travel to Regina for CWSF 2017, we have created a Visitor’s package that may be of interest you. More information can be found here. 
 
We look forward to welcoming your young scientist to Regina and plan to make this event an amazing experience for everyone!  
 
- Jim Jo and Jim Langen on behalf of the CWSF2017 Local Host Committee

 

From the CWSF 2017 Regina Host Committee
 
We are pleased and proud to welcome the 56th annual Canada-Wide Science Fair to Regina, Saskatchewan, May 14-21, 2017.  Approximately 500 of Canada’s top young scientists from grades 7 to 12 and CÉGEP will have the honour of representing their regional science fairs at this exciting event, with the opportunity to share in awards, prizes and scholarships that may very well shape their futures. Beyond showcasing their projects, students will:
  • SHARE a week with other Canadian students who are also interested in science and technology;
  • MEET new friends from across Canada;
  • INTERACT with scientists, engineers and other professionals who work here in Regina;
  • DISCOVER the wonders and beauty of Saskatchewan;
  • EXPLORE all that the University of Regina has to offer;
  • WELCOME visitors in the Exhibit Hall including students and teachers from every corner of the province of Saskatchewan;
  • ENCOURAGE others to build upon their curiosity in science and technology, and inspire the pursuit of scientific and technological solutions to the challenges that face the world;
  • CELEBRATE at our ceremonies and special events, DANCE their hearts out, EXPERIENCE cultural activities and some of the world-class attractions unique to this region.
 
We’re building upon the CWSF tradition of excellence to create an exciting week-long event for participants and delegates alike. Meanwhile, we wish all participants an abundance of inspiration and dedication as projects are prepared for regional fairs across Canada with the ultimate goal of being selected for the Canada-Wide Science Fair.
 
Good luck!  Hope to see you in Regina, Saskatchewan!  
 
CWSF 2017 Host Committee Co-Chairs,
 
Jim Jo and Jim Langen

Campus Tours - Optional (Sunday and Monday)

Finalists and delegates are encouraged to join us for a guided campus tour on arrival day(s). Tours will be offered in the early afternoon and evening on Sunday, as well as Monday morning. Tours will start with an overview of the essential CWSF facilities.
 

Mini Rendezvous (Sunday, during the day)

The Faculty of Science at the University of Regina will be hosting a Mini Science Rendezvous with exciting scientific demonstrations on the Academic Green space for the entertainment of arrivals!  Keep your eye on the green for fun things to see!
 

Finalist Lounge Meet and Greet at the Owl (Sunday 8:00-10:00 p.m.)

Join your fellow finalists as the University of Regina welcomes you to our campus with a relaxed evening in the Owl, the campus restaurant. Here you can meet other finalists from all over Canada as you prepare for what will surely be an exciting week! Bring your pins and a smile! Don't forget to wear your Regina “R” pin.
 

Activities Opening Ceremonies & Banquet (Monday)

The Opening Ceremonies and Welcome Event will be held Monday, May 15 at the Callie Curling Club from 5:00pm until 8:00pm. Participants will experience warm and friendly Prairie hospitality! The opening ceremonies will feature entertaining performances and fantastic food from the Southern Saskatchewan region. There is no need to dress up for the event, just eat, relax, and have fun! Meet new people and get acquainted, and have a casual evening before judging day!
 

Powerhouse of Discovery and IMAX (Tuesday Evening)

After an exhausting day of judging, come to the Eastern side of Wascana Park for a barbecue on the grounds of the Powerhouse of Discovery, Saskatchewan’s Science Centre, which includes an IMAX theatre. Three levels of science activities will be open to just to you, with three IMAX showing throughout the night. Tickets will be limited, so keep your ears open for more information!
 

Activities – On Campus Finalist & Delegate Lounges, (Monday-Saturday evenings)

As usual, we will have board games in the Finalist and Delegate Lounge, which will be hosted in the Owl, in the Riddell Centre (right next to your dining hall). There are also large common spaces in Wakpá and Paskwāw residences on every floor, with the second floor common areas being the largest. There will also be outdoor options hosted out of a tent on the Academic Green. We hope to have options for students of all types and temperaments! There will be no lounge on Tuesday (we’re keeping you out late), and Friday’s lounge will occur at the Conexus Arts Centre for those of you who need a break from the dance.
 

Activities Tour Day (Wednesday)

Explore Saskatchewan and the unique prairie environment! Pre-Registration for tours are required (in the registration system). Every CWSF 2017 participant will spend Tour Day (Wednesday) visiting Saskatchewan attractions by highway coach with a tour guide (In city tours will use a school bus). Lunch will be provided.
 
Saskatchewan is a place of huge distances and long drives – some tours will be leaving quite early and returning late. Please note the estimated tour length when you are selecting tours.
 
Tour day will include expeditions to the following locations. When you register, make sure you read tour descriptions carefully, because there are different variations of tours that travel to the same place but visit different attractions.
 

UR a Scientist! (Thursday Afternoon)

Participants will choose one hands-on activity from numerous sessions offered by some of faculty members and researchers on campus at the University of Regina and Saskatchewan Polytechnic.
Session topics will range from bat biology, plastics manufacturing, biomechanics, theoretical physics, cryptology, chemical synthesis, vaccines, cartography, bird biology, drafting, nursing, and more!
What's new this year at CWSF 2017?
  • The buildings you will be using the most are barely 5 minutes walk from each other, and there are no hills!
  • New schedule including project set-up starts on Monday, May 15 at 9:00am. See the CWSF schedule for complete details.
  • Hands-on activities in the exhibit hall during STEAM, a Festival of Learning
  • Several tour options highlighting science and art on the prairies, including both Francophone and First Nations cultures!
  • More engagement in the exhibit hall for finalists.
What will the weather be like in Regina in May?
Weather in Regina, Saskatchewan in May varies from year-to-year, and sometimes day-to-day, and can have the characteristics of any season. Because Regina is flat, winds can be significant! In general, be prepared for cool mornings and warm afternoons, but it would be best to check the Regina weather forecast closer to the event. Inclement weather, including snow, in May is rare but not unheard of.
 
Because most of the tours are outside, bring versatile clothing and appropriate walking shoes. We emphasize the importance layers in Saskatchewan, which will allow you to adjust for a morning blizzard, a balmy summer afternoon, and a stormy evening (we hope this doesn’t happen, but we do want you to be prepared!).
 
Will there be vegetarian food?
Yes, the caterers are fully prepared for vegetarian, vegan, kosher, halal and other food needs. Make sure to include your dietary restrictions in the registration system.
 
Will there be security for the projects?
Yes, there is 24-hour security provided in the Exhibit Hall. We recommend that students keep electronic devices with them overnight.
 
Are parents able to attend the Canada-Wide Science Fair events?
Parents and the general public are invited to visit the exhibits during public viewing; May 18th to May 20th. 
 
Tickets for the Awards Ceremony will be available for parents and the general public on a first-come, first-served basis. A special Visitors’ Package has been created for those wishing to spend a few days in Regina.  See "Visitors’ Package" for details.
 
Will there be buses running between events during the week?
Most events will take place on campus. Participants will be bussed to offsite events such as the awards ceremony.
 
Is the site wheelchair-accessible?
Yes. Campus buildings are fully accessible: however, please indicate any requirements during online registration.
 
Can I choose my roommates in residence? The majority of the rooms at the University of Regina are apartment style with a common living area and kitchen. Each finalist bedroom will be equipped with two extra-long single beds, a dresser, closet, desk, and chair. The common living area seating and a kitchen table. Finalists will be assigned to rooms based on gender, as will Delegates.
 
Can I have my own room in residence?
Bedrooms will sleep two people to a room. Apartment-style residences will have two to four bedrooms each. Four-bedroom apartments will have two bathrooms, whereas two- and three-bedroom apartments have one bathroom.
 
Will I be able to call home?
Yes. There are phones in the student residence buildings. We recommend that you bring a calling card for long distance calls. Participants are encouraged to phone home regularly. Cell phone etiquette is encouraged at all times.
 
Will there be Internet access during the CWSF?
Yes, wireless Internet will be available on campus, including the exhibit hall and residence rooms.
 
What if I need a computer for my project display?
Finalists must make their own arrangements for any equipment required. It is expected that the Finalist will bring their own device.
 
Do regions have to send a delegate of each gender if the region has male & female finalists?
No. While this is preferred for groups with more than five finalists, the residences and activities will be organized to ensure adequate supervision for both genders. Regional Delegates will share this responsibility.
 
What do I need to bring?
 
Clothing
Most of the week is casual and comfortable walking shoes are recommended however, many finalists choose to "dress up" for judging. The awards ceremony and banquet are designated as “dress-up” activities, which usually means a suit or jacket and tie for men and a dress or skirt/blouse or suit for women. Floor length dresses are not recommended.
 
Consider warm clothing, layers, and rain gear for outdoor portions of the event. A pullover sweater with a hood and single large pocket is advised; however, while you are In Saskatchewan, you must call this a bunnyhug.
 
Personal Items
  • For air travelers, one piece of valid government issued photo ID that shows name, date of birth and gender is required. Reference: Government of Canada - Identity Screen RegulationsNote: The name on the identification must match the “legal name” in the CWSF online registration system, which will appear on the boarding pass.
  • Money for personal expenses; 
  • Dress clothes for the Awards Ceremony/Banquet; business attire for judging; casual clothes for other occasions; comfortable shoes for walking and active tours.
  • One towel will be provided for each participant.
  • Health card and personal identification (see above for air travellers).
  • Comfortable footwear and clothes for all seasons. Check the Regina weather forecast closer to the event. You really could have all four seasons in one day.
  • Personal toiletries and required medications; Gravol for motion sickness on aircraft, trains, buses or boats.
  • Musical instruments and other performance items can be brought if you’d like to share your talents in lounge areas.
  • Reading material, games or other quiet activities for between judging interviews.
  • Camera, alarm clock, cell phone and charging devices.
  • Regional fair pins or other items for trading.
 
Project materials and supplies
  • All materials and equipment for your project, carefully packed to meet airline or shipping regulations. Please note that the new project display system will be used.
  • Supplies needed to set up the project must be placed in checked baggage only – Airport security will confiscate tools in hand luggage.
  • Backup digital files for your display materials (just in case), data/logbook and extra copies of the Project Report.
  • Materials needed to repack the display materials.
 
What does CWSF registration include?
CWSF registration includes all activities and events, as well as:
  • accommodation
  • meals
  • tours
  • local transportation
Travel to Regina is provided for regional participants (finalists, delegates, and support adults) through the CWSF Equalized Travel Plan.
 
Incidental costs incurred by participants (souvenirs, phone calls, purchased snacks, entrance to museums, etc.) or regions (activities in addition to the scheduled program) are not included.
 
IB Exams
The International Baccalaureate (IB) Program World Office rules state that IB candidates must write their exams at their home school. In recent years, this has meant that an IB candidate selected for the CWSF had to choose between the CWSF and writing his/ her IB exams.
 
Recently however, several CWSF finalists have been successful in securing an exception to this ruling, based on the fact that the CWSF is an "international event."
 
Section A9.5.4 of the Special Circumstances and Arrangements section of the IB Guidelines, which are only accessible to a school's IB coordinator (i.e., at the finalist's school), states that a student may write his/her IB exam(s) at another location if the exam scheduling conflicts with "an event of international significance" in which the student is participating. It goes on to specify that the event must have participants from two or more countries other than the host country. The CWSF qualifies under this provision, as we welcome participants from Australia, and Mexico.
 
Finalists with an IB exam or exams during the CWSF are encouraged to submit a Change of Venue for Exams to IB and they must request approval for the temporary leave to the Chair, National Policy Advisory Committee. Finalists must be present for the full Judging Day, all Public Viewing Hours and the Awards Ceremony.  See Policy 3.1.2.6 CWSF Responsibilities - Finalist, Section 4.1.3
 
The CWSF Finalist, together with his/her school IB Coordinator, must submit a Change of Venue for Exams request, citing "conflict with an event of International significance." If the request is successful, the IB office, in collaboration with the school's IB coordinator, will arrange to send the exam(s) to an IB school in the CWSF host community, where the finalist writes the exam(s) under their supervision.
 
Please note that Youth Science Canada has no involvement with, or influence over the success of these requests. Finalists - and their school's IB Coordinator - are urged to submit Change of Venue for Exams requests as early as possible to ensure the greatest probability of success.
 
There are a number of IB Schools in the Regina area.

Tour #1 Saskatoon – Canadian Light Source / Musée Ukraina Museum

  1. Tour the Canadian Light Source and watch samples being analyzed on the IDEAS beamline.
  2. Learn about the Ukrainian heritage and its contribution to Canada.

The Canadian Light Source, Canada’s only synchrotron light source facility, conducts research in health sciences, materials, agriculture and environment. Users from around the world apply to investigate scientific questions using the various beamlines. You will tour the facility and watch how samples are prepared and situated in a beamline for analysis.

The other half of this tour will take place at the Musée Ukraina Museum on Saskatoon’s west side. The museum chronicles the experiences of Ukrainian people, particularly their role as settlers in Saskatchewan. Learn dance steps from renowned Ukrainian dancers. The Ukrainian community is well known for their beautifully decorated pysanky (easter eggs). Learn how and why they are decorated the way they are. You will have time to explore the Ukrainian Catholic Cathedral of St. George and see the rich Ukrainian Eastern Byzantine rite architecture, art and iconography.

Your tour will begin bright and early at 6:30 a.m. for the 2 ½ hour drive to Saskatoon. Expect to return around 7:30 p.m.

 

Tour #2 Saskatoon – Western Development Museum / Wanuskewin Heritage Park

  1. Begin your day on 1910 Boomtown Street, learning about life in the prairies at the turn of the 20th century.
  2. In the afternoon, visit Wanuskewin Heritage Park and develop awareness, sensitivity and knowledge of the Northern Plains cultures.

The theme of the Western Development Museum branch in Saskatoon is 1910 Boomtown Street. This recreation of a typical prairie town in 1910 contains replicas of over 30 typical businesses. Other exhibits include the transportation gallery, the Cancer Bomb, Votes for Women: Towards Equality and tractors and farm machinery. The feature exhibit, Winning the Prairie Gamble, celebrates 100 years of Saskatchewan.

Wanuskewin Heritage Park sits above Opimihaw Creek and the South Saskatchewan River near Saskatoon – a window into a part of Canada’s history that remains largely undiscovered, and a link to our past unlike any other National Historic Site in Canada. Wanuskewin’s uniqueness is not just the fact that there exists evidence of ancient peoples, but rather the composition of many different aspects of habitation, hunting and gathering, and spirituality – all in one place. Your visit here will include a DVD presentation, access to all the trails, activity room and exhibits as well as hands-on program that will examine the archaelogy, history, significance of the Bison, connections to Earth and significant cultural aspects of the site at Wanuskewin and Northern Plains Indigenous culture.

Note: Much of your time at Wanuskewin will be outside so please wear appropriate clothing and shoes.

Your tour will begin bright and early at 6:30 a.m. for the 2 ½ hour drive to Saskatoon. Expect to return around 7:30 p.m.

 

Tour #3 Saskatoon – Wanuskewin Heritage Park / Western Development Museum

  1. Begin your day at Wanuskewin Heritage Park and develop awareness, sensitivity and knowledge of the Northern Plains cultures.
  2. In the afternoon, visit 1910 Boomtown Street to explore life in the prairies at the turn of the 20th century.

The theme of the Western Development Museum branch in Saskatoon is 1910 Boomtown Street. This recreation of a typical prairie town in 1910 contains replicas of over 30 typical businesses. Other exhibits include the transportation gallery, the Cancer Bomb, Votes for Women: Towards Equality and tractors and farm machinery. The feature exhibit, Winning the Prairie Gamble, celebrates 100 years of Saskatchewan.

Wanuskewin Heritage Park sits above Opimihaw Creek and the South Saskatchewan River near Saskatoon – a window into a part of Canada’s history that remains largely undiscovered, and a link to our past unlike any other National Historic Site in Canada. Wanuskewin’s uniqueness is not just the fact that there exists evidence of ancient peoples, but rather the composition of many different aspects of habitation, hunting and gathering, and spirituality – all in one place. Your visit here will include a DVD presentation, access to all the trails, activity room and exhibits as well as hands-on program that will examine the archaelogy, history, significance of the Bison, connections to Earth and significant cultural aspects of the site at Wanuskewin and Northern Plains Indigenous culture.

Note: Much of your time at Wanuskewin will be outside so please wear appropriate clothing and shoes.

Your tour will begin bright and early at 6:30 a.m. for the 2 ½ hour drive to Saskatoon. Expect to return around 7:30 p.m.

 

Tour #4 Poplar River Coal Mine & Power Plant

  1. This tour will visit Westmoreland Coal’s Poplar River Mine (an open pit coal mine) and the Saskatchewan Power Poplar River Power Plant to show how coal is mined and transformed into electricity.

The Poplar River Mine is owned and operated by Westmoreland Coal and boasts some of the largest earth moving equipment in North America, including 2 draglines which remove 90 cubic yards of earth with each bucketful. The local coal mine supplies the fuel to the Poplar River Power Station which takes the total lignite coal production from the mine. The Poplar River Power Station is Saskatchewan's most environmentally advanced coal-fired (thermal) generating station. On the tour you will see how coal is mined and transformed into electricity for use by the residents of Saskatchewan.

Note: This tour involves considerable walking and is situated in an industrial setting. Closed toe shoes are required. The tour operators provide hard hats, safety glasses and vests. There will be some downtime at the power plant because only groups of 15 can tour at a time. Please bring a Frisbee, book or games for entertainment.

Your tour will begin bright and early at 6:30 a.m. for the 2 hour drive to Coronach. Expect to return around 5:30 p.m.

 

Tour #5 Claybank Brick Plant & Massold Clay Canyons / Avonlea Heritage Musuem

  1. Begin with a tour of the historic Claybank Brick Plant and explore the Massold Clay Canyons.
  2. In the afternoon, you will tour the Avonlea Heritage Museum.

The Claybank Brick Plant is North America’s best-preserved brick making site, virtually unchanged from the day it opened in 1914. The rare fire brick produced here lined the fire boxes of the CN and CP Rail line locomotives, and of the Corvette warships in World War II. The fire brick was also used in the construction of the rocket launch pads at Cape Canaveral, Florida. The landscape of the Massold Clay Canyons has been in place since the last glacial age, the Wisconsin, which retreated approximately 10,000 years ago. You will have time to explore the flora, fauna, geology and historical features of this unique area. As part of your time at Claybank, you will make a Saskatoon berry pie from scratch that you get to eat.

After lunch, you will travel to the town of Avonlea and tour the Avonlea Heritage Museum, which contains local artifacts from pioneers who homesteaded the area in the early 1900s. The museum is situated in the former Canadian Northern railway station which was built in 1912. In the other buildings, you will see large murals by local artist Paul Geraghty, the Main Street display and Avonlea Before the Plow exhibit.

Note: Much of this tour is outside.

Your tour will begin at 8:00 a.m. Expect to return home around 4:00 p.m.

 

Tour #6 Big Muddy Badlands

  1. This is a full-day tour of the Big Muddy Badlands to explore the unique geography and history of this region of southern Saskatchewan.

This full-day, guided tour will visit the geographically unique Big Muddy Badlands to see Castle Butte, cone-shaped hills, steep cliffs, eroded clay formations and sandstone formations that resemble petrified tree trunks. In the late 1800s, cattle rustlers and train robbers from the United States hid out in the Big Muddy Valley, which was part of the Outlaw Trail. You will visit the Sam Kelly Caves, one of their most famous hiding places. You will also see stone effigies and Indian ceremonial rings that date from the time when Chief Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse and an estimated 700 Plains Indians lived in Canada to escape persecution from the U.S. government. Other points of interest including the North West Mounted Police detachment that was established at Big Muddy in 1902 and the Paisley Brook School from the early 1900s.

Note: This tour is primarily outside and involves extensive hiking. Please wear appropriate clothing.

Your tour will begin at 7:30 a.m. Expect to return home around 6:00 p.m.

 
Tour #7 Moose Jaw – Tunnels of Moose Jaw / 15 Wing

  1. Explore the Tunnels of Moose Jaw to learn about the story of early Chinese immigrants to Canada in an hour-long guided tour.
  2. The afternoon includes a guided tour of 15 Wing, the home of Canada’s military pilot training and the Canadian Air Forces Snowbirds military air demonstration team.

The stories of tunnels under the streets of Moose Jaw come alive in an interactive 50-minute theatre tours featuring state of the art animatronics characters, a multi-media presentation, fabulous spaces underground and tour guides in character. The Passage to Fortune tour tells the compelling story of Chinese immigration to Canada in the early 1900s. You become an immigrant and follow in their footsteps through Burrows and Sons Laundry, in darkened tunnels under the streets and in the kitchen of Mr. Wong’s cafe. Your passage to fortune is just around the corner.

15 Wing, headquartered in Moose Jaw, is the centre of Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) aircrew training and is comprised of 402 Squadron in Winnipeg, MB, 419 Squadron in Cold Lake, AB, 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School (CFFTS) in Moose Jaw, SK, and 3 CFFTS in Portage la Prairie, MB. 15 Wing is also home to the Canadian Air Forces Snowbirds military aerobics display team.

Note: The tunnel portion of the tour involves walking and is underground. There may be approximately 45 minutes of downtime at the Tunnels as groups of 15 will depart every 15 minutes. Please bring a Frisbee, book or games for entertainment.

Your tour will begin at 8:30 a.m. Expect to return home around 4:30 p.m.

 

Tour #8 Moose Jaw – Western Development Museum / Tunnels of Moose Jaw / RCMP Heritage Centre

  1. Students will begin by exploring the Western Development Museum to explore the history of transportation on the prairies.
  2. Explore the Tunnels of Moose Jaw to learn about the story of early Chinese immigrants to Canada in an hour-long guided tour.
  3. Explore the RCMP Heritage Centre in Regina at the end of the day. This includes a guided driving tour of the facility and time to visit the displays inside.

The theme of the Western Development Museum branch in Moose Jaw is the Story of Transportation. You can tour permanent exhibits including galleries dedicated to rail, water, land and air travel as well as winter travel, classy cars, an observatory and the Snowbirds Gallery. The feature exhibit, Winning the Prairie Gamble, celebrates 100 years of Saskatchewan.

The stories of tunnels under the streets of Moose Jaw come alive an interactive 50-minute theatre tour featuring state of the art animatronics characters, a multi-media presentation, fabulous spaces underground and tour guides in character. The Passage to Fortune tour tells the compelling story of Chinese immigration to Canada in the early 1900s. You become an immigrant and follow in their footsteps through Burrows and Sons Laundry, in darkened tunnels under the streets and in the kitchen of Mr. Wong’s cafe. Your passage to fortune is just around the corner.

End your tour day at the RCMP Heritage Center which is located on the historic grounds of RCMP Academy “Depot” Division, the home for training members since 1885. The main gallery will take you on a journey through the history of the Mounted Police and its evolution from a frontier police force to a modern police force known the world over. Anchored by the evocative “March of the Mounties” showcasing the history of RCMP transportation, the story is told through six core exhibits. There is a self-guided audio tour app available for download.

Note: The tunnel portion of the tour involves walking and is underground. There may be approximately 45 minutes of downtime at the Tunnels as groups of 15 will depart every 15 minutes. Please bring a Frisbee, book or games for entertainment.

Your tour will begin at 8:30 a.m. Expect to return home around 5:00 p.m.

 

Tour #9 Moose Jaw – 15 Wing / Western Development Museum

  1. Students will begin by exploring the Western Development Museum to learn about the history of transportation on the prairies.
  2. The afternoon includes a guided tour of 15 Wing, the home of Canada’s military pilot training and the Canadian Forces Snowbirds military air demonstration team.
  3. End your day at the Royal Saskatchewan Museum to tour the life sciences, earth sciences and First Nations galleries.

15 Wing, headquartered in Moose Jaw, is the centre of Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) aircrew training and is comprised of 402 Squadron in Winnipeg, MB, 419 Squadron in Cold Lake, AB, 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School (CFFTS) in Moose Jaw, SK, and 3 CFFTS in Portage la Prairie, MB. 15 Wing is also home to the Canadian Air Forces Snowbirds military aerobics display team.

The theme of the Western Development Museum branch in Moose Jaw is the Story of Transportation. You can tour permanent exhibits including galleries dedicated to rail, water, land and air travel as well as winter travel, classy cars, an observatory and the Snowbirds Gallery. The feature exhibit, Winning the Prairie Gamble, celebrates 100 years of Saskatchewan.

The Royal Saskatchewan Museum furthers an understanding of Saskatchewan’s natural history and aboriginal cultures, past and present. Explore many specimens and artifacts in each gallery, including the new We are All Treaty People exhibit.

Note: This tour involves extensive walking.

Your tour will begin at 8:30 a.m. Expect to return home around 5:30 p.m.

 

Tour #10 Fort Qu’Appelle – Fish Culture Station / Treaty 4 Governance Centre

  1. Tour the provincial fish culture station to learn about fish stocking operations in Saskatchewan and the species involved, including fish spawning, incubating eggs, and rearing fingerlings.
  2. Visit the Treaty 4 Governance Centre to learn about the signing treaties between First Nations and the Canadian government and the role of treaties in today’s society.

Unique in North America, the Fort Qu'Appelle Fish Culture Station produces both cold and cool water fish species, raising 3/4 million trout and 40 million walleye annually. You will see fish being reared from the egg through to adult stages in the various indoor and outdoor tanks.

The Treaty 4 Governance Centre is located on the hills above the town of Fort Qu’Appelle overlooking the beautiful Qu’Appelle valley. Approximately one-third of Saskatchewan’s 70 First Nations are located within the boundaries of Treaty 4. You will learn about the signing of Treaty 4 and why the Government of Canada wanted to negotiate treaties with First Nations, the terms of the treaty and the impact of treaties on First Nations and all citizens of Canada.

Note: Part of this tour is outside.

Your tour will begin at 9:00 a.m. Expect to return home around 4:30 p.m.

 

Tour #11 Yorkton – Young’s Equipment / Lajord Hutterite Colony / Western Development Museum

  1. Being with a visit to Young’s Equipment to see a modern, large agricultural equipment dealer.
  2. The Lajord Hutterite Colony is representative of the 50+ colonies in Saskatchewan and their communal society that embraces technology to support their agricultural operations.
  3. Finish the day at the Western Development Museum in Yorkton and learn about the lives and cultures of pioneer immigrants from around the world.

This tour kicks off a visit to Young’s Equipment – a leading agricultural equipment dealer that services farmers in southern Saskatchewan. The mechanization of farming is considered one of the top ten engineering accomplishments of the 20th century. During your visit at Young’s Equipment, you will get to see some of the latest technology in agriculture machinery – and learn about career options in this field as well!

The next stop on the tour is a visit to the Lajord Hutterite Colony. The Hutterite people live in colonies belonging to the largest, oldest, and most successful communal society in the Western World. Contrary to the Amish, the Hutterite people have embraced technology to the finest degree for the well-being of their community. Embrace their hospitality and willingness to open their lives to us and share their unique lifestyle, their knowledge, their faith in the health system, their love of the land and their spirituality. Not only with you be guided by young Hutterite women, you will also have a wonderful conversation with them about their way of life.

After a wonderful home-cooked lunch, prepared with Colony harvested food, the group will get on the open road and travel to Yorkton. Yorkton is the largest city in east-central Saskatchewan. Located 120 km east of Regina, the community of 16,000 has a large Ukrainian and German population. We will visit the Western Development Museum and explore the lives and cultures of early pioneer immigrants from around the world. Enter a real settler shack, explore how and why people have come to Saskatchewan from all over the world and trace this province’s history through a 100-year timeline.

An unforgettable experience awaits you!

Your tour will begin at 8:00 a.m. Expect to return home around 5:30 p.m.

 

Tour #12 Experience Agriculture: the Foundation of Saskatchewan’s Past, Present and Future

  1. Begin your day at the Evergreen Cattle Ranch to see a modern, large cattle operation.
  2. The Motherwell Homestead showcases life for late 19th century homesteaders.
  3. At Green Atlantic Farms, you will learn about precision farming and the role of technologies in farming today.

Bright and early, we will head to the wide-open spaces on the Saskatchewan Prairies and visit Evergreen Cattle Co. near Ituna. Producing beef and grass is the core business of this family-owned ranch. Adrienne and Aaron Ivey were Saskatchewan’s Outstanding Young Farmers in 2014 and today they run a herd of over 1200 cows. The cows will be grazing in the pasture and May is calving time at the Ivey ranch.

After learning about ranching, we will take a step back in time and travel to the Motherwell Homestead in Abernathy, SK. At the close of the 19th century, a stream of pioneer-farmers moved west from Ontario, seeking a new life on the Prairies. Early Saskatchewan settler, W.R. Motherwell became a community leader whose passion for scientific farming methods took him all the way to Parliament as Minister of Agriculture. Here we will enjoy lunch and then experience a day in the life of a prairie farmer in the 1900s.

Fast forward to 2017 and the next stop is Frank and Kari Groeneweg’s grain farm, Green Atlantic Farms, by Edgeley. The science of agriculture is continuously advancing. Today Saskatchewan boasts many farmers who are at the cutting edge of technology. Frank is one of these farmers, he is passionate about promoting modern agriculture as the most sustainable way to “feed the world”. His interests include precision farming and equipment technologies. Frank and Kari will be busy seeding their 7500 acres of wheat, canola, peas, flax, and fababeans and this stop will highlight some of the modern equipment used on grain farms today.

Your tour will begin at 8:00 a.m. Expect to return home around 5:15 p.m.

 

Tour #13 - Royal Saskatchewan Museum / Subsurface geological lab / RCMP Heritage Centre

  1. Subsurface Geological Laboratory
  2. RCMP Depot Division and Heritage Centre
  3. Royal Saskatchewan Museum

Why would anyone store more than 10 million kilograms of rock in a warehouse in the middle of the prairies? Come to the Subsurface Geological Lab and explore the largest repository of drill core samples in the province. Examine core samples and learn how geologists use the core samples to determine where to drill for petroleum, natural gas, industrial minerals and uranium deposits. View 3-D models of a section of rocks in the 3-D projection room.

Since 1885, the RCMP Academy "Depot" Division in Regina has been training members of Canada's national police force. Tour Depot and learn about its history as the headquarters of the North West Mounted Police and its current role as a training academy. Participate in the same drills cadets experience and watch the Sergeant Major's Parade which includes a roll call and inspection of the troops, accompanied by the Cadet Band.

The RCMP Heritage Centre is dedicated to telling the story of the RCMP through interactive exhibits, audio tours and programming in six main galleries: Creating a Mounted Police, Maintaining Law and Order in the West, Protecting the North, Serving All of Canada, Preserving the Tradition and Cracking the Case.

The Royal Saskatchewan Museum furthers an understanding of Saskatchewan's natural history and aboriginal cultures, past and present. Explore specimens and artifacts in each gallery, including the new We are All Treaty People exhibit.

 

Tour #14 Regina – Francophone

This tour will be provided in French.

  1. Joe Fafard studio / foundry
  2. RCMP Depot Division / RCMP Heritage Centre
  3. Walking tour of downtown Regina, including Wascana Park.

Joe Fafard is an internationally recognized Francophone sculptor who has worked mainly in bronze. His art is heavily influenced by his Saskatchewan roots and includes life-sized bronze sculptures of cows, horses and pigs. Your visit will include his gallery and/or foundry.

Since 1885, the RCMP Academy “Depot” Division in Regina has been training members of Canada’s national police force. Tour Depot and learn about its history as the headquarters of the North West Mounted Police and its current role as a training academy. Participate in the same drills cadets experience and watch the Sergeant Major’s Parade which includes a roll call and inspection of the troops, accompanied by the Cadet Band.

The RCMP Heritage Centre is dedicated to telling the story of the RCMP through interactive exhibits, audio tours and programming in six main galleries: Creating a Mounted Police, Maintaining Law and Order in the West, Protecting the North, Serving All of Canada, Preserving the Tradition and Cracking the Case.

 

Tour #15 - Francophone Culture

  1. Willow Bunch Museum
  2. Campagne organic farm

Explore the francophone culture in south-central Saskatchewan. Your first stop will be in the town of Willow Bunch. Here you will visit the Willow Bunch Museum and learn about the life of the Willow Bunch Giant – Edouard Beaupre – who grew to over 8’ tall and see artifacts dating back to the early 1900s. On the second floor, exhibits showcase early Métis settlers, the NWMP, hospital and school.

After leaving Willow Bunch, you will travel to the Campagne family’s organic farm. Solange and Paul Campagne will take half of the group to learn about the science of organic farming and tour the family operations. Annette Campagne will explore the relationship between science, spirituality and art with the other half of the group.
Lunch at the farm will include authentic home-grown organic food, followed by a bilingual musical performance by the Campagnes. There may also be wagon rides to explore the surrounding countryside.

Your tour will begin at 8:00 a.m. Expect to return home around 6:00 p.m.

YOUTH SCIENCE CANADA

Online Registration, Awards Program, Sponsors and General Inquiries
  • Toll-free: 866-341-0040 ext. 230 (Lori Murray)
  • Toll-free fax: 866-613-2542
  • info@youthscience.ca or lori.murray@youthscience.ca
 
CWSF Event/Logistics
  • Toll-free: 866-341-0040 ext. 231 (Julia McDevitt)
  • Toll-free fax: 866-613-2542
  • julia.mcdevitt@youthscience.ca
 
Media 
  • Reni Barlow - reni.barlow@youthscience.ca
 
Travel Inquiries
Participants should check with their region’s CWSF Team coordinator regarding travel information. He/she receives regular updates from the Youth Science Canada Equalized Travel Plan Coordinator.
 
CWSF 2017 HOST COMMITTEE

TBA
 
 

Awards Ceremony

The Awards Ceremony will be held at Conexus Art Centre on Friday, May 19, 2016 from 15:30-17:30.
 
Address: 
200 Lakeshore Drive
Regina, SK
S4S 7L3
 
Following the Awards Ceremony, all attendees will have the opportunity to mingle with new friends and enjoy photo ops. Buses will transport Finalists and Delegates to and from the Art Centre. A schedule will be provided in your welcome package.
 
Tickets for the Awards Ceremony will be available to visitors on a first come, first served basis.  See Visitors' Package for all the details. 
 

Awards Gala Dinner and Dance Celebration

The fun will continue downstairs in the Convention Hall as we celebrate an amazing week of accomplishments! CWSF 2017 Finalists and Delegates will be invited downstairs to enjoy a celebratory Awards Gala Dinner and Dance. Snacks and the usual Finalist Lounge activities will be available as well. This event is open to Finalists and Delegates only. 

 

On Thursday, May 18th the Exhibit Hall will close for two hours so Finalists can have hands on experiences in classrooms and labs on and off campus. 
 
A full list of experiences can be found below.  You will be able to indicate your preference while registering. 
 

1. Bats, Bats and More Bats! – Mark Brigham Bats represent 14 of all mammal species yet are poorly studied compared to most other mammals. They also, like snakes, spiders and Maple Leaf fans, don't get much respect. Spend an hour with the real Batman and learn some of the facts about bats and why they are amongst the most beneficial animals. We will do our very best to have a live animal on hand so you can shake a wing and get a good close look.

2. Are Microplastics Taking Over the World? – Britt Hall Microplastics are defined as any plastic with a diameter less than 5 mm and are prevalent in our aquatic environments. Problems associated with these plastics, such as contamination of both marine and freshwater environments and ingestion by aquatic organisms, are of increasing concern. Our lab quantifies the microplastics in water and fish in a prairie creek immediately north of Regina. Learn about microplastics, how you can help reduce them in the environment, and isolate and identify microplastics from common personal care products.

3. Biomechanics – Paul Bruno/John Barden Spend some time in a biomechanics lab as we demonstrate various types of equipment including a motion capture system, EMG system, and force plates. We will also talk about practical and clinical applications of the work we do and how it applies to your world!

4. EYES – Problem Solving Through Engineering Try your luck at using technology and engineering to complete a set of challenges from the EYES staff. Using your knowledge of the basics of building, to more complex theories in physics, you will work together in small groups to design and build solutions to overcome challenges that engineers face each day. We will also have an interactive display, including a few robots.

5. Wave Phenomena – Shaun Syzmanski Waves are an exciting and important area in physics. They surround us every day, from mechanical waves to sound and light. Come and see our waves demonstrations from the most basic to the very complex with a finale that involves fire and music.

6. Mathematics and Cryptology – Patrick Maidorn / Michael Kozdron / Shaun Fallat Explore how mathematics and statistics can be used to create and break secret messages. We will look at both historical and modern codes, from codes used in antiquity to issues in internet security.

7. So You Think You Know About Trees? (Bilingual) – Daniel Gagnon Annual tree growth rings (laid down by trees around their trunk circumference in temperate and boreal regions) can reveal much to the inquisitive scientist. You can of course determine the age of a tree by counting the number of growth rings. (Is there always one per year?) The width of the growth rings can also tell you how fast the tree has grown. (Are old trees always larger, young trees always smaller?) Variations in growth ring width can be correlated with recorded climate data to reveal past climate conditions, before meteorological stations existed. Also, carbon-14 dating of organic archeological artifacts or fossil remains has been made more precise with corrections made from bristlecone pine growth rings (8000 year chronosequence). Come and see tree cores under the microscope and discuss these various aspects. There will also be some tree cross sections (where you can see the growth rings) that will astound you!

8. DNA Isolation – John Stavrinides DNA is central to our understanding of organismal biology, taxonomy, and evolution, and is also used in forensics to solve crimes. In this activity, you will carry out a DNA extraction from fruits/vegetables using common household reagents. You will be introduced to the chemistry of the extraction, as well as the underlying importance of DNA in organisms.

9. Inorganic Synthesis – Brian Sterenberg Explore phosphorus-carbon bond formation using tungsten phosphenium complexes, and characterization of the product using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy. The synthesis will be carried out using an inert atmosphere glovebox, and you will get hands-on experience using the glovebox. The reaction will involve the formation of a tungsten-coordinated phosphenium ion, followed by addition of an organic substrate, leading to phosphorus-carbon bond formation. Once the synthetic reaction is complete, the product will be characterized by 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopy, using a Varian 300 MHz NMR spectrometer. You will have the opportunity to analyze a spectrum and determine the chemical structure of the product.

10. The Science of Vaccines – Christopher Yost Vaccines are a critical tool to protecting the health of humans from infectious diseases globally. Despite this clear value there is misinformed debate in the North American popular press regarding the value and importance of vaccines. In this interactive session, you will learn the principles of how vaccines work, and most importantly, how rapidly infectious diseases can spread in the absence of a vaccination program. Be an active participant in simulated disease outbreaks and pandemics and learn how to identify the origins of an outbreak and observe in real-time the strength of vaccination programs in protecting public health. Become an outbreak detective and find the origin of a simulated outbreak.

11. An Exploration of Infinity – Douglas Farenick (Bilingual) We will try to understand what "infinity" means. Can there be more than one type of infinity? Are there infinitely many different infinities? Can we do arithmetic with infinity? How can we know such things? We will explore these questions by thinking together about them.

12. The Biology of Snakes – Christopher Somers Learn about the basic biology and diversity of snakes, one of the most interesting but maligned groups of animals on the planet. You will have the opportunity to interact with live animals and see some of their key features first-hand!

13. Math in the Real World – Peter Douglas Solve actuarial case studies using probability. You will be working in small groups to create a solution to your chosen problem. Present your findings and see how other groups approached their problem!

14. Interpreting Maps, or How Not To Get Lost – Monica Cliveti Build a map in a special sandbox equipped with an X-box camera. When it’s done, we'll turn the projector on and you will see your map come to life with colours and water patterns. In the second part of this session you’ll get to look beyond the surface, using microscopes and stereoscopes to look at the minerals and fossil elements in the rocks that surround us, while learning to identify basic fossils and minerals.

15. Diatoms – Maria Velez/ Yunuen Temoltzin Loranca Prepare your own microfossil, then, using a microscope, discover this “small world.” Using your findings, you will be able to reconstruct a past environment to put together a piece of history.

16. Introduction to the Quark Model – Garth Huber At the smallest scales of atomic matter are mysterious fundamental particles known as quarks and gluons, governed by the laws of quantum physics. These particles have fascinating properties, such as fractional charge and exceptionally strong types of interactions. One of the central unsolved problems of modern physics concerns our deepest understanding of how these quarks and gluons govern the properties of the matter. This session will give you the chance to learn about the physics of quarks and gluons and some of the ways we can study them.

17. What bird is that? – Gabriel Foley Learn how to identify birds. We will first learn how to identify the most abundant local birds, then take these skills outside and apply them. Surveying birds is one common way biologists measure an ecosystem's health, and the ability to correctly identify bird species is a crucial component of those surveys.

18. Chemistry… More Than Balancing Equations! – Allen East Learn about computational chemistry involving molecular graphics software. You will learn to operate the software which will allow you to predict the colour of blue jeans or determining if a woman is pregnant by predicting and matching the NMR spectrum of her estrogen.

19. Virtual Tour of the Large Hadron Collider – Nikolay Kolev Take a virtual tour of the biggest particle physics experiment to date. Examine how the detectors for these experiments work and how the data analysis is performed. We will discuss what the hopes are for discovering new physics, in particular supersymmetry and dark matter. We will meet (online) scientists that work at the LHC in France and Switzerland. You will also perform data analysis tasks on real and simulated data.

20. Physical Activity Epidemiology Lab: Sitting, Standing, Moving and Your Health – Katya Herman This workshop will expose you to knowledge and activities related to the health benefits of physical activity and why sitting too much is bad for your health. You will have the opportunity to wear an “accelerometer” device for a short time to measure your movement, and receive personal results. You can also measure your blood pressure and test your grip strength.

Sask Polytech: Contact Terry Seto

21. Engineering Design and Drafting Technology (EDDT) – TBD Engineering Design and Drafting Technologists participate in multi-discipline engineering projects. In this dynamic role, technologists use industry-standard software to collaborate, design, model, draft, coordinate and document projects in many disciplines, such as construction, mining and manufacturing. You will participate in a practical experience that includes using CAD software to design and produce an engineering project in a 2D environment.

22. School of Nursing Simulation Labs – TBD If you are interested in health care, you will love this session! See and experience SaskPolytech’s state-of-the-art simulation labs where health care professionals gain the necessary training to excel in their field. You will also see robotic mannequins that have the ability mimic a real patient’s response to treatment. More than 120 different scenarios, from heart attacks to allergic reactions, can be replicated by these mannequins.

Special Awards (Nomination Required)

The list below includes all available Special Awards. A project may be nominated for up to three Special awards. Only those awards for which a project is eligible will appear in the Special Awards area of the CWSF online registration system.

The three rows below each award - Junior, Intermediate and Senior - indicate whether the award is available to projects in that category. "N/A" indicates that the award is not open to that category.

 

The Actuarial Foundation of Canada Award

Sponsor: The Actuarial Foundation of Canada

An outstanding project that demonstrates effective use of one or more of mathematics, database manipulation and statistical analysis, combined with written and oral communication skills and creativity to investigate or solve a complex problem.

Preference may be given to projects that quantify potential losses or design creative ways to manage or reduce the likelihood or impact of undesirable events.

Junior: $500 cash and certificate
Intermediate: $750 cash and certificate
Senior: $1,000 cash and certificate

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Canadian Acoustical Association Award

Sponsor: Canadian Acoustical Association

An outstanding senior project related to acoustics, the science of sound.

Junior: N/A
Intermediate: N/A
Senior: $1,000 cash and certificate plus a subscription to the Canadian Acoustical Association’s quarterly journal

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Canadian Artificial Intelligence Association Award

Sponsor: Canadian Artificial Intelligence Association (CAIAC)

An outstanding junior project in artificial or computational intelligence.

Junior: $500 cash and certificate
Intermediate: N/A
Senior: N/A

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Canadian Association for the Club of Rome Award

Sponsor: Canadian Association for the Club of Rome

An outstanding project that demonstrates or identifies innovative ways to mitigate climate change in Canadian residences through reduction of carbon dioxide production. Preference will be given to projects that make creative use of widely available products and technologies, integrated with emerging technologies (e.g., Internet of Things). Creativity, originality, practicality and safety must be evident.

Junior: N/A
Intermediate: N/A
Senior: $1,000 cash and certificate

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Canadian Orchid Congress Award

Sponsor: Canadian Orchid Congress

An outstanding senior project that is related to the biology and/or conservation of orchids, their culture or biochemical products. Preference will be given to projects related to native Canadian orchid conservation. The winner will prepare a webinar on the project with the assistance of the Canadian Orchid Congress to be published on their website.

Junior: N/A
Intermediate: N/A
Senior: $1,000 cash and certificate

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Canadian Society for Clinical Chemists Award

Sponsor: Canadian Society for Clinical Chemists

An outstanding senior project related to the use of laboratory testing to better patient care.

Junior: N/A
Intermediate: N/A
Senior: $1,000 cash and certificate

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Canadian Society for Medical Laboratory Science Award

Sponsor: Canadian Society for Medical Laboratory Science

An outstanding intermediate project related to health sciences demonstrating excellence in the planning and design of a biomedical experiment, innovation or study relevant to medical laboratory science.

Junior: N/A
Intermediate: $750 cash and certificate
Senior: N/A

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Canadian Stockholm Junior Water Prize

Sponsor: Canadian WEF Member Associations, the Canadian Water and Wastewater Association, and Xylem Canada

Senior outstanding projects related to one or more of: stormwater, water and wastewater quality, water resource-management, water protection, water or wastewater treatment, water education and other social or science related aspects of water.

Up to three projects selected at the CWSF will then be required to submit a written report of their project for final selection. One winning project will then be chosen to represent Canada at the Stockholm Junior Water Prize Competition. The two runner-up projects will each receive a $300 cash prize.

Junior: N/A
Intermediate: N/A
Senior: All-expenses paid trip to Stockholm, Sweden, August 27-September 1, 2017, for up to two student(s) of the winning project to represent Canada at the International Stockholm Junior Water Prize Competition (www.sjwp.ca).

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CAP Physics Prize

Sponsor: Canadian Association of Physicists

An outstanding project related to the science of physics.

Junior: $500 cash and certificate
Intermediate: $750 cash and certificate
Senior: $1,000 cash and certificate

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Carlson Wagonlit Award

Sponsor: Carlson Wagonlit Travel

An outstanding junior project related to transportation.

Junior: $500 cash and certificate
Intermediate: N/A
Senior: N/A

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Engineering Innovation Award

Sponsor: Engineering Institute of Canada / Canadian Society of Senior Engineers

An outstanding project related to engineering demonstrating an innovative, creative and well-tested solution to a real world problem.

Junior: N/A
Intermediate: $750 cash and certificate
Senior: N/A

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Excellence in Astronomy Award

Sponsor: Royal Astronomical Society of Canada

An outstanding project related to astronomy - observational, instrument construction or other.

Junior: Telescope and certificate plus a one year youth membership in the RASC
Intermediate: Telescope and certificate plus a one year youth membership in the RASC
Senior: N/A

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First Nations University of Canada Award

Sponsor: First Nations University of Canada

An outstanding junior project that celebrates Aboriginal people’s accomplishments and traditional knowledge by showcasing, exploring, reinforcing and expanding intersections between Indigenous knowledge and Western science.

Junior: $500 cash and certificate
Intermediate: N/A
Senior: N/A

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4-H Canada Award

Sponsor: 4-H Canada

Sustainable Agriculture Award
An outstanding junior project related to sustainable agriculture or farming.

Food Security Award
An outstanding junior project related to food security or food service.

Junior: $500 cash and certificate
Intermediate: N/A
Senior: N/A

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International Summer School for Young Physicists Award

Sponsor: Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics

An outstanding Senior CWSF finalist who demonstrates a keen interest and a strong aptitude in both physics and mathematics. The finalist’s project need not be in the area of physics. The chosen finalist must be fluent in both written and spoken English.

The award consists of a full scholarship to participate in the International Summer School for Young Physicists 2017 (ISSYP 2017) from July 16-29, an intensive two week enrichment program that will introduce the student to the fascinating picture of our universe as seen through the eyes of contemporary physicists: from the bizarre quantum world of atoms and subatomic particles to black holes, warped spacetime and the expanding universe. The student will also interact with professional physicists at Perimeter Institute in small group mentoring sessions, participate in field trips to leading experimental science laboratories, and forge new friendships with like minded young people from around the world. The scholarship includes room and board and travel expenses to and from the Institute.

Junior: N/A
Intermediate: N/A
Senior: Full scholarship to participate in the International Summer School for Young Physicists 2017 from July 16-29 at Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Ontario.  Total value $3,500.

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Nutrients for Life Foundation Award

Sponsor: Nutrients for Life Foundation Canada

An outstanding intermediate project related to fertilizers, plants and soil science.

Junior: N/A
Intermediate: $750 cash and certificate
Senior: N/A

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Renewable Energy Award

Sponsor: Ontario Power Generation

An outstanding project related to both energy and air quality with a demonstrated interest in environmental stewardship.

Junior: $500 cash and certificate
Intermediate: $750 cash and certificate
Senior: $1,000 cash and certificate

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S.M. Blair Family Foundation Award

Sponsor: S.M. Blair Family Foundation

A project that merits application for a patent.

According to the Canadian Intellectual Property Office…
In order to be eligible for a patent, your invention must meet three basic criteria:

1. The invention must show novelty (be the first in the world).
2. It must show utility (be functional and operative).
3. It must show inventive ingenuity and not be obvious to someone skilled in that area.

The invention can be a product (for example, a door lock), a composition (for example, a chemical composition used in lubricants for door locks), an apparatus (for example, a machine for making door locks), a process (for example, a method for making door locks), or an improvement on any of these.

A patent is granted only for the physical embodiment of an idea (for example, the description of a possible door lock) or for a process that produces something tangible or that can be sold. You cannot patent a scientific principle, an abstract theorem, an idea, some methods of doing business, or a computer program per se.

Fast fact: Ninety percent of patents are for improvements to existing patented inventions!

You can search over two million Canadian patents from the past 75 years at the Canadian Patents Database:

http://brevets-patents.ic.gc.ca/opic-cipo/cpd/eng/introduction.html

Junior: $500 cash and certificate
Intermediate: $750 cash and certificate
Senior: $1,000 cash and certificate

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SHAD Scholarship Award

Sponsor: SHAD

Intermediate: An outstanding project by a finalist in grade 10 who has been offered a place at SHAD 2017 or who will apply to SHAD 2018. Awarded to a finalist who exhibits the SHAD values of creativity, excellence, community, diversity, and responsibility. Single projects only.

Senior: An outstanding project by a senior finalist who has been offered a place at SHAD 2017 or who will apply to SHAD 2018. Awarded to a finalist who exhibits the SHAD values of creativity, excellence, community, diversity, and responsibility. Single projects only.

Junior: N/A
Intermediate: Placement at SHAD 2017 or can apply to SHAD 2018
Senior: Placement at SHAD 2017 or can apply to SHAD 2018

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Statistical Society of Canada and Biostatistics Section Award

Sponsor: Statistical Society of Canada and Biostatistics Section

An outstanding intermediate project in statistical theory, or one that makes use of sound statistical techniques in study design, data analysis and data presentation.

Junior: N/A
Intermediate: $750 cash and certificate
Senior: N/A

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Statistical Society of Canada Award

Sponsor: Statistical Society of Canada

An outstanding senior project in statistical theory, or one that makes use of sound statistical techniques in study design, data analysis and data presentation.

Junior: N/A
Intermediate: N/A
Senior: $1,000 cash and certificate

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University of Ottawa Undergraduate Research Scholarship (URS)

Sponsor: University of Ottawa

An outstanding Senior project by a finalist (or finalists) in grade 11 or grade 12 (Secondary V, CÉGEP I or CÉGEP II in Quebec) who is admissible to pursue university studies in science at uOttawa. In the case of a team project, each finalist will be eligible to receive a scholarship.

The University of Ottawa will provide the recipient or recipients with more detailed information during the days following the Canada-Wide Science Fair.

The recipient will work with scientists and take part in important scientific discoveries during two consecutive summers. In the summer preceding the first year of studies in an undergraduate program at the Faculty of Science, University of Ottawa, the recipient will earn $3,750 as a research assistant to one of the world class professors. By succeeding in the first year of studies, the research experience will be extended to a second summer, during which he/she will earn $6,250.

Junior: N/A
Intermediate: N/A
Senior: $10,000 award ($3,750 + $6,250)

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Weizmann Canada Award for Scientific Achievement

Sponsor: Weizmann Canada

One outstanding senior finalist. The finalist must be in his/her final year of high school or CÉGEP in Quebec demonstrating a passion for science. Please note: The Weizmann Institute program is conducted in English; therefore, all participants must be fluent in English. Single projects only.

Junior: N/A
Intermediate: N/A
Senior: This scholarship provides the opportunity to attend the Dr. Bessie Lawrence International Summer Science Institute at the Weizmann Institute in Rehovot, Israel from July 4-30, 2017. The winner must have a single project, demonstrate a passion for science and currently be in their final year of high school or Cégep prior to the starting date and be fluent in English. The total scholarship value is $9,000, which pays for the registration fee and return airfare from a major Canadian airport to Israel.

Details of the program can be found here:

http://www.weizmann.ca/giving-opportunities/education/international-summer-science-institute

Download permission form

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Youth Can Innovate Awards

Sponsor: The Gwyn Morgan and Patricia Trottier Foundation

Outstanding innovation projects selected for their ingenuity, originality, development and potential social and economic benefits. Youth Can Innovate judges may, depending upon the number of self-nominations, focus their interview time on a shortened list of projects that appear most applicable to the Youth Can Innovate Award criteria.

Junior: Four projects will each receive a $500 cash award and certificate
Intermediate: Four projects will each receive a $750 cash award and certificate.
Senior: Eight projects each receive a $1,000 cash award and certificate. Four of these Youth Can Innovate Award winners will also be announced as winners of an additional $7,000 cash award.

STEAM will be the premiere showcase of Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math education and implementation featuring student, community, and professional groups from every corner of the province!   STEAM will fill both Gym B and C at the Centre of Kinesiology, Health, and Sport, as well as any open space in the exhibit hall, with engaging hands-on science activities applied to real life situations!  Finalists will have time to view STEAM themselves on Thursday, Friday and Saturday.  Thousands of students from all Saskatchewan schools districts will be visiting STEAM on Thursday and Friday as well, to interact with finalists and participate in STEAM activities.  The public will be invited to STEAM on Thursday evening and Saturday morning.
Visit the CWSF App to check the schedule for the week:
 
Your Ultimate Canadian Science Fair Resource

Pre-order your hoodie for pick up at CWSF 2017!

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BlogPosts

Tue, Feb 21, 2017 - Dominic Tremblay
Thu, May 19, 2016 - Jessie MacAlpine
Wed, May 18, 2016 - Jessie MacAlpine
Tue, May 17, 2016 - Jessie MacAlpine
Tue, May 17, 2016 - Jessie MacAlpine